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Appalachian Bear Rescue Named a Finalist in Toyota's 2012 100 Cars for Good Program

Toyota’s donating 100 cars to 100 nonprofits in 100 days, public to choose the winners on Facebook  

 

Media Contact:

Heather Ripley, FletcherPR
T: 865-249-8371
heather@kellyfletcherpr.com

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. May 14, 2012- The Appalachian Bear Rescue (ABR), a Townsend-based rehabilitation center for orphaned and injured black bear cubs, announced today that it has been selected as one of 500 nonprofit finalists in Toyota’s 100 Cars for Good program, a major philanthropic initiative in which the automaker is giving 100 cars to 100 vehicles over the course of 100 days. ABR was selected as a finalist from more than 4,000 applications nationwide.

 

Each day, beginning May 14, 2012, 100 Cars for Good will profile five finalists at www.100carsforgood.com

 

Individual members of the public will be able to vote for which ever nonprofit they think can do the most good with a new vehicle. The nonprofit with the most votes at the end of each day will win one of six Toyota models. Runners-up will each receive a $1,000 cash grant from Toyota.


The Appalachian Bear Rescue will be up for consideration on Wed., May 23 from midnight to 11:59 p.m.

 

“We are thrilled to have been selected as a finalist for the 2012 100 Cars for Good program,” said ABR spokeswoman Heather Ripley. “Our curator Rick Noseworthy is using an old pick-up truck that was once caught in a flood. The constant trips to get food for the orphaned cubs and the trips to meet the wildlife officials to collect injured cubs are often delayed because of mechanical problems. A new vehicle would make an incredible difference to our organization.”

 orphaned cubs (little bears are eating machines!), and the trips to meet wildlife officers to collect injured cubs, are often delayed because of mechanical problems. Then orphaned cubs (little bears are eating machines!), and the trips to meet wildlife officers to collect injured cubs, are often delayed because of mechanical problems. Then he must rely on a borrowed vehicle... if available. Wasted time! A new vehicle would make all the difference to an organization that's trying to make a difference. Please remember May 23, and vote for Appalachian Bear Rescue.

“At Toyota, we appreciate what a significant impact a new car can have for nonprofits nationwide,” noted Michael Rouse, vice president of philanthropy for Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A. “Toyota has donated more than half a billion dollars to nonprofits across the U.S. over the past 20 years, and 100 Cars for Good allows us to expand that commitment to local communities in important new ways. The 500 finalists are an extraordinary group, and we look forward to the public learning more about them.”

 

100 Cars for Good is the first initiative to directly engage the public to determine how Toyota’s philanthropic donations are awarded.

 

For more information on the Appalachian Bear Rescue and its efforts to win one of Toyota’s 100 Cars for Good, please visit the website at www.abrtn.org. You can also follow ABR on Facebook or Twitter at @AppBearRescue. For complete information on 100 Cars for Good and profiles of all 500 finalists, please visit www.100carsforgood.com

 

Local residents are encouraged to support the Appalachian Bear Rescue and its quest for a new Toyota Tundra.

 

A six-year, 100,000-mile powertrain warranty will also be provided for each vehicle, compliments of Toyota Financial Services.

 

About Toyota

Toyota (NYSE: TM) established operations in the United States in 1957 and currently operates 10

manufacturing plants in eight states. Toyota directly employs nearly 30,000 people in the U.S. and its investment here is currently valued at more than $18 billion, including sales and manufacturing operations, research and development, financial services and design facilities. Toyota's annual purchasing of parts, materials, goods and services from U.S. suppliers totals more than $23 billion. Toyota is deeply committed to being a great community partner and is focused on supporting programs in ways that achieve long-term sustainable results. Toyota supports numerous organizations across the country, with a particular concentration on education, the environment and safety. Since 1991, Toyota has contributed more than half a billion dollars to philanthropic programs across the U.S. For more information on Toyota, please visit www.toyota.com

 

About Toyota Financial Services (TFS)

TFS is the finance and insurance brand for Toyota and Lexus in the U.S., offering retail auto financing and leasing through Toyota Motor Credit Corporation (TMCC) and Toyota Lease Trust and extended service contracts and other payment protection products through Toyota Motor Insurance Services (TMIS). TFS employs 3,300 associates nationwide, and has managed assets totaling more than $91 billion. It is part of a worldwide network of comprehensive financial services offered by Toyota Financial Services Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Toyota Motor Corporation.

 

 

About Appalachian Bear Rescue

Appalachian Bear Rescue (ABR), located just outside the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Townsend, Tenn., is a one-of-a-kind rehabilitation center for orphaned and injured black bears and those in need of medical care. ABR is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that has been returning black bears back to the wild since 1996.

 

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